As of June 14, 2020, homelessness is up in Los Angeles County for the third time in four years, a result of an ever-growing number of people who cannot afford the region's high housing costs. LA's annual homeless count, released Friday, shows that 66,433 people now live on the streets, in shelters and in vehicles within the county. That's up 12.7% from 2019. Within LA city limits, the number of people experiencing homelessness is 41,290, a 14.2% increase over last year. These significant increases come despite hundreds of millions of dollars spent and, according to county officials, a system that is housing a record number of people. In 2019, LA's homeless services system placed nearly 23,000 people in homes, according to the report by the LA Homeless Services Authority.

Our collaborative solutions bring needed attention and funding to community-based programs that have proven successful and sustainable. 
Once in office, we will propose a bill to bring needed funding to those community programs that have been omitted from any city, state and federal funding. 
Effective programs are being suspiciously overlooked by government.
We will eliminate the red tape blocking funds to the most effective programs.
Los Angeles’ epic homeless crisis has become a self-perpetuating industry.  Our goal is to end homelessness in America, starting in our district.
Our solution is comprehensive.  By addressing key onset triggers, such as:
  •  Increase in expenses
  • Life changing events
  • Divorce
  • Layoffs
  • Rent increases
  • Death of a bread winner
  • Domestic violence and abuse
The first tier of our approach is to provide financial assistance in coordination with existing services with FULL TRANSPARENCY.
For those already displaced and living in motor homes or other vehicles and still employed, we propose coordination with available community-based housing programs and available housing with FULL TRANSPARENCY.
 
SERIOUS HELP FOR PEOPLE STRUGGLING WITH MENTAL ILLNESS AND ADDICTION
From Skid Row to Malibu to Palos Verdes and all points in between, living on the street should not be an option for those struggling with mental illness and addiction.  Public-private partnerships and use of facilities like the LA County Hospital (currently vacant) can provide immediate shelter and triage.  For long-term rehabilitation and/or permanent homes, large facilities such as abandoned military bases, can be employed.  Here, needed services will be provided including vocational training, drug and alcohol rehabilitation, and psychiatric treatment.
Once there is a place for Homeless individuals to go, then courts can begin to enforce vagrancy laws.  Such enforcement is important to protect the rights of both property owners and renters. 
I’d like to thank Dr. Kenneth Wright for his contribution to the ideas described above, particularly his proposal to utilize LA County Hospital/s and other service recommendations.
SOLUTIONS = GIVING PEOPLE A HAND UP
INSTEAD OF JUST HANDING THEM A SANDWICH